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3D Printing VS Injection Molding

3D Printing VS Injection Molding: Pros & Cons

Plastic injection molding is a tried and true method of production that is in no danger of going away anytime soon. It is a basic, dependable method of producing high-quality plastic parts. Despite recent improvements in the technology of 3-D printing and those likely to emerge in the future, the fact is that more than 80 percent of plastic parts used in products today have to be injection molded.

QUANTITY. So for production runs, injection molding is still the best manufacturing method, especially considering the long production time involved for 3-D printing compared to injection molding.

QUALITY. One of the key limitations of 3-D printing is the inability to make parts with the same physical properties as conventional injection molded parts. Although the number of various materials available for 3-D printing seems to be constantly increasing, it is still limited compared to all the various plastic materials that can be injection molded. While a 3-D printed prototype might be acceptable for evaluating its shape, there is no way to test the material characteristics if your prototype is not the same material as the production part will be.

Although the ability of 3-D printing to hold tighter part tolerances is expected to improve with advanced process designs (like parallel printing) and optimization, today the part quality achieved in 3-D printing is inferior compared to injection molding.

COST. The overall cost of a 3-D printed part compared to an injection molded part is tied to the quantity being produced, assuming the aforementioned quality issues do not preclude 3-D printing as an option out of the gate. In the study at Lowell, the cost of 3-D printing 300 of a certain size part was $20 each. The piece price of injection molding a million such units with a steel mold was just $1.13 each.

Another cost factor to consider is that associated with a design change in the prototyping stage. In 3-D printing, there is no cost of modifying a mold for a prototype iteration. Design changes are simply made to the CAD model.

Within injection molding, design changes with a steel mold are typically easy to make and relatively inexpensive, but with aluminum molding tools, a design change may require the expense of all new tooling.

Additionally, new simulation software is now available to help resolve injection molding challenges in software – rather than through costly, time-consuming prototyping iterations. Testing molds in a virtual simulation environment cuts across communication barriers and allow designers, mold makers, and manufacturing professionals to collaborate more efficiently and effectively while eliminating the need for costly prototype and mold cycles.

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